Singleton button naughts and crosses game

Travelling books – singleton button quilt game

I am participating in our group project – called travelling books, this month I was creating a page for our delightful hard working Secretary, who is a very talented Dorset button maker and gamer!

how to make a singleton button

There is not much you need to make Singleton Buttons – they have also been described as self cover buttons. If you are making a garment or have knitted your way through a jumper or cardigan and can’t find buttons to match then these little delights are the answer! You can make them in any fabric to match your clothing!

I used key rings, but you can use old fashioned curtain rings of the size you would like your button to be.

Simply cut out a circle of fabric twice the width of the ring, and do a running stitch approximately half way between the ring and the outer edge. I tend to use cotton Perle because it is quite strong.

tutorial for self cover buttons, singleton buttons and dorset buttons

Place a tiny piece of wadding or toy filling in the centre. How much, or how little, you use will either make your button domed or flat.

tutorial for self cover buttons, singleton buttons and dorset buttons

Pull the tread to gather the fabric around the ring, and secure with a few stitches. I have used a popper on the bottom of my button for the game, but you can make these traditional buttons by stitching through the centres.

tutorial for self cover buttons, singleton buttons and dorset buttons

Stitch with a running stitch round the ring – this gives the button definition, but you can leave it unstitched if you prefer.

tutorial for self cover buttons, singleton buttons and dorset buttons

Attach the backing to the button and then you have completed the button.

quilted naughts and crosses using singleton buttons

I made a little quilted game using two types of buttons, strawberry and polka dots. I used a large gingham square for the ‘board’ section and used a running stitch and weaved the red around it to create a candy stripe.

Each square has a popper so that you can play the game

The poppers allow the game to be played, with each player taking a turn on the 9 square grid, the first one to make a line of three wins the game. The additional square on the left, is for the spare button, as each player needs 5 buttons.

Travelling book, Singleton button quilt to play naughts and crosses game

Here is the finished page, such fun to do!

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Montessori Mobile

montessori mobile

At three months a baby is able to see things further away- so bright mobiles that move easily in any breeze are advocated for visual tracking and concentration.

Montessori mobiles are expensive, but you can make something that works just as well with a few feathers, light cotton and an embroidery hoop.

The great thing about this idea, is that you can re-use the embroidery hoop for a different mobile once this stage has ended.

Simply tie the feathers to a length of light cotton thread and then loop around an embroidery hoop. Attach hanging threads to the top to suspend from the ceiling.

It is a good idea to place the mobile near a breeze or open window so that the feathers turn slightly.

 

 

Geisha Door Stop

Just look what I found in a charity shop, a pretty little dollie from Monsoon. It looks as if someone had a go at making her but lost interest just the sort of project I love.
Now I don’t really need a doll, but I thought she would make a lovely doorstop. I used the soap powder bottle as a way of giving her a bit of stability and filled it with salt to add weight to so she can hold the door open. It was such a lovely little project to work on and she does do a grand job, don’t you think?